FILTER RESULTS × Close
Skip to Content ☰ Open Filter >>

Object Results

Showing 4 of 4


Unknown Photographer



Chicago's Superintendent of Schools Benjamin C. Willis confers with Dr. Virginia F. Lewis, a black woman, who was appointed Assistant Superintendent for Racial Integration by the Board of Education, August 11, 1965
Vintage wire photograph on paper
9 3/8 x 6 3/4 in. (23.81 x 17.15 cm)

Creation Place: North America
Technique: Photography
Credit Line: Restricted gift of Michael Mattis and Judy Hochberg in honor of Myrlie Evers-Williams.
Accession Number: P2021.13.456

Commentary
Aide Named For School Integration: Chicago's Superintendent of Schools Benjamin C. Willis confers with Dr. Virginia F. Lewis, a black woman, who was appointed Assistant Superintendent for Racial Integration by the Board of Education. Dr. Lewis, a veteran of nearly 40 years' service in the Chicago school system, was recommended for the position by Dr. Willis.

Benjamin C. Willis, Superintendent of Schools in Chicago in the 1960s, was accused of perpetuating segregation by refusing to move black children into white schools. Willis presided over Chicago's schools in the era of court-ordered desegregation, after the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and passage of the Civil Rights Act ten years later. His critics charged that he purposely kept black children at overcrowded schools in the inner city, while spaces went begging at schools in white neighborhoods. To many Civil Rights leaders, who led protests against Mr. Willis from 1963 to 1965, his 13-year tenure as superintendent was symbolized by the 625 mobile classrooms he established to alleviate overcrowding at mostly-black schools on Chicago's South Side. The critics called the mobile classrooms ''Willis Wagons.'' In 1963, protests broke out when Civil Rights leaders and black students accused Mr. Willis's administration of fostering segregation in the schools. Protesters burned mobile classrooms, boycotted classes, went on hunger strikes and picketed Mr. Willis's home. The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led some of the protests against Mr. Willis. At the 1963 March on Washington, 3,000 Chicagoans strode down Pennsylvania Avenue chanting ''Down with Willis.'' For three stormy years full of similar upheavals, Mr. Willis kept his post, finally leaving in 1966, four months before his term was to end.

Marks
On recto: typewritten title and date.
On verso: date stamp.

Materials
Wire photographs were originally transmitted over phonelines, then later, by satellite. They were first used in the early 1920s. Associated Press became a leader with this. After pigment touch-ups, etc., the print is put into a drum (like a drum scanner). The image gets converted into audio tones that are transmitted. The tones are received and beamed onto photo-sensitive paper. Wire photographs are copies without originals---they are hybrid, transmitted objects. (Britt Salvesen, Curator and Department Head, Photography Department, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, March 30-31, 2022)

Keywords Click a term to view the records with the same keyword
This object has the following keywords:

Additional Images Click an image to view a larger version

Dimensions
  • Image Dimensions: 9 3/8 x 6 3/4 in. (23.81 x 17.15 cm) Measured by Cornejo-Reynoso, Aitzin
  • Sheet Dimensions: 10 x 8 1/16 in. (25.4 x 20.48 cm) Measured by Cornejo-Reynoso, Aitzin


Your current search criteria is: Keyword is "RNA".




The content on this website is subject to change as collection records are researched and refined and may be subject to copyright restrictions.
For further inquiries, contact Associate Director/Registrar Steve Comba at steven.comba@pomona.edu.